Electronic Worship

The following article, “Electronic Church” was written by Wayne Jackson.  It is an excellent article that stresses the importance of assembling together to worship as well as the dangers of the “electronic church.” It is especially appropriate at a time when far too many elders, preachers, and other influential “church leaders” have seen fit to cancel the times of assembling together and opted instead to “assemble for worship” through the use of social media. As Christians, we are commanded to assemble on a regular, weekly basis.  The Greek word translated “assembling” in Hebrews 10:25 means “a gathering together into one place.” Social media does not, cannot, satisfy the command to assemble.  While there are those who undoubtedly have health issues that warrant their foregoing assembling together, there are far too many who will justify canceling services of the church while they shop in crowded stores, send their children to crowded schools, and forego “social distancing” to sit at restaurants across from one another without wearing masks.  Such inconsistency!  Is it too risky to assemble to conduct Bible classes, but not too risky for these other activities? What example does this set for others? Does this not present a stumbling block for others? How will others in our community view the church when we they see us cancel Bible classes but gather in public places to eat?   It is my concern that, as a result of the acceptance of worship through the use of social media, many Christians will eventually quit assembling altogether.  I honestly hope time proves me wrong!

Christians, assemble! Parents, see that your children are in Bible classes! And yes, of course, teach them throughout the week. Make your religion a “daily” religion! As Christians, may we ever learn to act out of faith and never act out of fear.  “For God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind.” (II Timothy 1:7)

Electronic Church

By Wayne Jackson

In recent months numerous articles have focused attention upon the phenomenal value of the World-Wide Web as an evangelistic tool. A recent issue of the popular denominational journal, Christianity Today, was devoted entirely to this medium of communication as it relates to religious information. Twenty percent of those who use the Internet do so for religious purposes. During the final quarter of last year, twenty million people accessed various web sites seeking metaphysical data. Two million Americans visit the Web every day for spiritual guidance. Surely Christians should see the value in teaching the gospel of Christ via this increasingly popular medium.

At the same time, there are dangerous pitfalls associated with the Web.

An Avenue for Error

There is a vast range of false teaching that clutters the World-Wide Web. Everything from Eastern mysticism, to religious agnosticism, to sectarianized “Christianity” is available. They can be invited right into your home – with but the click of a “mouse.” Some sites are very professionally done and therefore, are slick avenues for promoting error to the unsuspecting.

The Web also accommodates a wide variety of “church nuts,” providing them with an opportunity to peddle their wares, when they could never secure an audience otherwise. Anyone with the right kind of technical skill can get a web site going, whether or not they know anything at all about the Bible. In the minds of some, their very presence, via such a sophisticated medium, legitimizes their endeavor. This is a part of the “price tag” for “freedom of the press.”

Unfortunately, some Christians, unwittingly or otherwise, assist with the propagation of error by their “links” network. Some web sites, operated by members of the church, have elaborate link connections to other sites. And yet, virtually every link directs the viewer to a denominational source – some of which are rank with false teaching. Apparently, there is not a solitary Christian web site worthy of their recommendation. What message does that convey? A revealing one for those who consider the matter thoughtfully.

A Substitute for Corporate Worship

A news service recently quoted Brenda E. Brasher, a theology-philosophy professor, and author of the book, Give Me That Online Religion, who says that, “One of the best-kept secrets of cyberspace is the surprising amount of religious practice that takes place there.” Brasher has found more than a million religion-oriented web sites, with many of them virtually functioning as temples and churches.

For many people, sitting in front of a computer and accessing a religious web site, has become a spiritual exercise that fulfills their need for a worshipping experience. A new study by the Barna Research Group suggests that “by the end of the decade, we will have in excess of 10 percent of our population who rely upon the Internet for their entire spiritual experience” (emp. added).

For a long time anemic Christians have rationalized their slothful religious devotion by appealing to the use of various media or electronic devices. Some churches, for example, broadcast their Sunday morning services; a few perfectly-healthy, though lazy, members rationalize remaining at home on the ground that “we can tune-in the services on the radio.” Many a preacher has heard this line during a gospel meeting: “We can’t be at the meeting on Friday evening; we’re having a family outing. But we’ll get the tape!”

As wonderful as the new tools for electronic evangelism are, they can never function as a substitute for assembling with the people of God at the prescribed times for engaging in corporate worship. There are Bible commands and principles that obligate us to “come together” when we are able to do so, and no “flip of a switch” can satisfy those demands upon able-bodied people.

Jackson, Wayne. “Electronic Church.” ChristianCourier.com. Access date: August 21, 2020. https://www.christiancourier.com/articles/364-electronic-church

From the Time You Were a Child

In II Timothy 3:15, Paul wrote, “And that from a child thou hast known the holy scriptures, which are able to make thee wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus.”  How was it that Timothy was able to know the scriptures from the time he was a child?  No doubt he had been taught by his grandmother, Lois, and mother, Eunice. 

What great influence these two women had on Timothy!  No doubt Timothy, being taught the scriptures from a very young age, could not look back and remember a time when he had not heard about God! 

Paul’s words to Timothy still serve as an important reminder for all parents today. Children, when they grow older, should never be able to look back and remember a time when they were not taught about God.  A time when they were not present at every worship service and every Bible class! A time when they did not pray daily!  A time when their parents did not study the scriptures and teach them to their children! 

“And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart:  And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.” (Deuteronomy 6:6-7)

Why Be Thankful?

“And let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to the which also ye are also called in one body; and be ye thankful.” (Colossians 3:15)  The Scriptures command us to be thankful.  But, have you ever wondered why we should be thankful?  Who benefits most when we are thankful?  Us?  Or God?  Click the play button below to find out!

Will You Always Be Faithful?

bible-998150_960_720Will you still be living faithfully to God ten years from now?  How about five years?  How about this time next year?  “Well, of course,” you say, “I’ll always be faithful!  I would never leave God.”    I’m glad you feel that way.  But remember, there are many who have become unfaithful who, at one time, probably expressed that very same sentiment.

Why should a Christian remain faithful?  It seems like a simple question.  But I think it’s still a fair question to ask.

First, I should remain faithful to God so that Christ will not have died in vain.  It was a great act of love on God’s part to give His son so that we may enjoy eternal life (John 3:16).  Jesus’ submitting to His Father’s will and experiencing the death of the cross was the greatest act of love any man could do for another (John 15:13).

Yet if, after becoming a Christian, I later become unfaithful, Christ will have died in vain; at least from my perspective.  Some would deny the clear and plain Bible teaching concerning the possibility of a Christian falling away and going back to a state of being lost in his/her sins.  But not the apostle Paul!  He understood the possibility of being a “castaway,” rejected or disqualified concerning the race he so strongly encouraged others to run (I Corinthians 9:24-27).  Peter understood the possibility of, after being converted to Christ, falling back into the world and being lost (II Peter 2:20-22).

If I refuse to remain faithful to Christ and His church, His death will profit me nothing!

Second, I should remain faithful to God so I can have the very best life on this earth!  In Mark 10:17-22 we read about Jesus’ conversation with the rich young ruler.  When Jesus told him to sell what he had and give to the poor, the young man, unwilling to part with his possessions, went away sorrowful.  Peter then responded, “Lord, we have left all, and have followed thee” (Mark 10:28).  From Matthew’s account of this incident, we know Peter is asking, “Lord, we left all to follow thee.  What shall we have?” (Matthew 19:27) Notice Jesus’ response.  “And Jesus answered and said, Verily I say unto you, There is no man that hath left house, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my sake, and the gospel’s,  But he shall receive an hundredfold now in this time, houses, and brethren, and sisters, and mothers, and children, and lands, with persecutions; and in the world to come eternal life.” (Mark 10:29-30)

Shall I take Jesus’ words literally?  Is Jesus really teaching that anyone who follows Him will own a hundred houses?  Surely not!  What then, is Jesus saying?  Notice the last part of verse 30, “and in the world to come, eternal life.” The blessings Jesus promised to Peter, and us today, were distinct from the blessing we will eventually enjoy in heaven – eternal life! I believe the point Jesus is making to Peter is simply this: Whatever anyone may give up to become a Christian will pale in comparison to the blessings of being a Christian – even while living here on earth! Live this life with heaven as your goal.  While here on earth, stay focused in heaven!  But never forget that the best life anyone could ever live here on this earth is the life of a Christian!

Third, I should remain faithful because of my influence.  Influence can be defined as “the capacity to have an effect on the character, development or behavior of someone or something.”  Someone may say, “Not me.  I’m not going to have an influence on anyone.  I’ll just live my life and let everyone else live theirs!”

Solomon allowed his wives to have an evil influence on him, causing him to turn his heart away from the one true God and instead follow after false gods.  I Kings 11:4.

In contrast, Timothy was influenced for the good by his mother and grandmother.  Timothy knew the scriptures from the time he was a child.  II Timothy 3:15. How did Timothy come to know the scriptures?  No doubt he had been taught by his mother and grandmother.  II Timothy 1:5. Our influence continues even after we are gone!  Hebrews 11:4

Friends, it’s not possible to live without having an influence on others!  Others, maybe your family, friends, or even coworkers, are watching you.  They need you to remain faithful!  They need your positive influence.

Fourth, I should remain faithful because there is a judgement to come.  There is a day coming when I will be judged by Christ for the things I have done, whether they be good or bad.  “For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ; that every one may receive the things done in his body, according to that he hath done, whether it be good or bad.”  II Corinthians 5:10. Notice the word “must.”  This is an absolute imperative.  We cannot forego, or escape, the judgment.  Notice the words “we must all.”  No one will be exempt from being judged. Notice the words, “the judgment seat of Christ.”  We will be judged by God through His Son, Jesus Christ.  Christ is well suited to be our judge because He lived on this earth, faced the same temptations we face and knows what it is like to experience the difficulties of this life.  Notice the words, “whether it be good or bad.”  When judgment day comes, some will be able to hear the words, “Well done, thy good and faithful servant.” They will be able to experience an eternity with God in heaven.  Sadly, others will experience an eternity separated from God and all His people.

Why should you be faithful?  It’s a fair question to ask.