Excluding the Scriptures Leads to Confusion

It’s an easy mistake to make when studying the Bible, focusing on only one verse that addresses a certain topic to the exclusion of other verses that also address that same topic.

No single verse in the Bible procropped-bible-medium.jpgvides all we need to know about any given subject. For example, consider the question, “What did Jesus say while on the cross?”  From Matthew’s account of the crucifixion we know that Jesus said, “Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani” meaning “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me” (Matthew 27:46).  If we limit our study of Jesus’ words from the cross to Matthew’s account of the crucifixion, this is all we know about what was said.

From Mark’s account of the crucifixion we also know that Jesus said “Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani” meaning “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me” (Mark 15:34).  If we limit our study of Jesus’ words from the cross to Mark’s account of the crucifixion, this is all we know about what was said.

From Luke’s account of the crucifixion we know that Jesus said “Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do” (Luke 23:34).  Luke also includes Jesus’ words “Verily I say unto thee, Today shalt thou be with me in paradise” (Luke 23:43) and “Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit” (Luke 23:46).  If we limit our study of Jesus’ words from the cross to Luke’s account of the crucifixion, this is all we know about what was said.

From John’s account of the crucifixion we know that Jesus said “Woman, behold thy son” (John 19:26), “Behold thy mother” (John 19:27), “I thirst” (John 19:28) and “It is finished” (John 19:30).  If we limit our study of Jesus’ words from the cross to John’s account of the crucifixion, this is all we know about what was said.

Not one of these verses that deal with Jesus words from the cross, if studied to the exclusion of other verses, provides a complete answer to the question, “What did Jesus say while on the cross?”  But when we consider all of them together, we know that Jesus, while on the cross, said “Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani meaning My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me, Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do, Verily I say unto thee, Today shalt thou be with me in paradise, Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit, Woman, behold thy son, Behold thy mother, I thirst,” and “It is finished.”  It is only when we study all the verses that address Jesus’ words from the cross that we have a complete understanding of what Jesus said while on the cross.

A second example can be seen when a person considers the question: “What must I do to be saved from my sins?”  It is easy to make the mistake of focusing on only one verse (or a few verses) that answers this most important question to the exclusion of other verses that also address this same question.  Unfortunately, it’s also a very costly mistake.

Many preachers are quick to quote John 3:16 as one verse that explains God’s plan of salvation.  For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”  The truth is this one verse alone does not explain God’s plan of salvation.  If I limit my study to John 3:16, the answer to “What must I do to be saved from my sins” would be incomplete.  John 3:16 says nothing of the need to confess my faith before others.  Should I then conclude that this confession is not necessary?  Not at all!

I might go to Luke 13:3-5 for the answer: “I tell you, Nay: but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish. Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them, think ye that they were sinners above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem? I tell you, Nay: but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish.”  I understand from these verses that I must repent of my sins to be saved.  But these verses say nothing of the need to believe.  Again, if I limit my study to Luke 13:3-5 my answer would be incomplete.

Still others are quick to mention Romans 10:9-11 to answer the question, “What must I do to be saved from my sins?” “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.  For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed” (Romans 10:9-11). Do these verses provide a complete answer to the question “What must I do to be saved from my sins?”  Not at all!  They say nothing of the need to repent!  If I focused on these verses to the exclusion of others, I would not know that I need to repent to be saved from my sins!

How then can I find the answer to my question?  I must consider all the verses that deal with man’s salvation.  When I do this, I learn that, to be saved from my sins, I must hear the gospel of Christ. “So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God” (Romans 10:17).

I learn that I must believe the gospel of Christ.  I must believe that Jesus left heaven and lived a sinless life while on earth.  “For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin” (Hebrews 4:15).  I must believe that Jesus gave his life for me, that he offered himself on the cross as the only sacrifice that can ever take away my sins.  For this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins” (Matthew 26:28). I must believe that he was victorious over death (I Corinthians 15:55-57), that he rose from the grave (Matthew 28:5-6) and ascended back to heaven where he now sits at the right hand of God.  “But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God;” (Hebrews 10:12).

When I study all the verses that deal with my salvation I learn that I must repent of my sins.  “And the times of this ignorance God winked at; but now commandeth all men every where to repent:” (Acts 17:30).  A person repents of his sins when he changes his will and decides to conform to God’s will.  He decides to live a life that is pleasing to God rather than self.

When I study all the verses that deal with my salvation I learn that I must confess my faith in Christ to others.  “For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation” (Romans 10:10).

  When I deal with all these verse that answer the question “What must I do to be saved from my sins” I learn that I must be baptized to receive the forgiveness of my sins.  Those present on the Day of Pentecost heard Peter’s preaching and were pricked in their hearts (Acts 2:37).  They asked Peter and the rest of the apostles “Men and brethren, what shall we do” (Acts 2:37)?  We can learn something when we consider what Peter did not tell them to do.  Peter did not tell them there was nothing for them to do, for this would have been an incorrect answer.  Peter did not tell them to pray the sinner’s prayer for this too would have been an incorrect answer.  Peter did not tell them to simply admit they were sinners and ask Jesus to come into their hearts and save them, for this too would have been an incorrect answer.  No friends.  Peter told them to “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:38).

When I study all the Bible says concerning the question, “What must I do to be saved from my sins” I learn that I must hear and believe the gospel of Christ, repent of my sins, confess my faith in Jesus Christ before others, and be baptized to receive God’s forgiveness.

Many preachers incorrectly exclude baptism as a condition of salvation.  They are quick to refer to one (or a few) verse that relates to the topic of salvation to the exclusion of other verses that relate to that same topic.

The statement is often made that baptism is a work and we are not saved by works.  Make no mistake about it.  We are saved by God’s grace.  “For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God:” (Ephesians 2:8).  We can never earn our salvation. “For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord” (Romans 6:23).  We can never be deserving of heaven.  We can never be saved by meritorious works!

It is also true that no man can be saved by the works of the law of Moses.  “For as many as are of the works of the law are under the curse: for it is written, Cursed is every one that continueth not in all things which are written in the book of the law to do them. But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident: for, The just shall live by faith” (Galatians 3:10-11).

Can I then conclude that God’s forgiveness requires no works of any kind on my part?  Not at all!  In the context of being set free from the bondage of sin the apostle Paul wrote, “But God be thanked, that ye were the servants of sin, but ye have obeyed from the heart that form of doctrine which was delivered you” (Romans 6:17).  It is true that none of us can be saved by meritorious works or works of the law of Moses.  But it is also true that God extends His grace to us in response to our works of obedience.

Baptism is no more a work than is hearing the gospel, believing the gospel, repenting of our sins or confessing our faith.  Each of these things (hearing, believing, repenting, confessing) is something that man is commanded to do.  They each require activity on man’s part.  It should not be ignored that Jesus called believing a work.  “Jesus answered and said unto them, This is the work of God, that ye believe on him whom he hath sent” (John 6:29).   Baptism is a commandment to which we submit and allow God to do His work.  Baptism is a work of God!  “Buried with him in baptism, wherein also ye are risen with him through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him from the dead” (Colossians 2:12).

What must I do to be saved from my sins?  Eternity is too long to settle for an incomplete answer!

2 thoughts on “Excluding the Scriptures Leads to Confusion

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s